Tips

How To Measure Windshield Wiper Blades

Measuring windshield wiper blades is so simple, you might second guess yourself and wonder if there’s more to it. Nope!

measure-wiper-blades.png

Use a tape measure to determine the length of the wiper blade along the rubber wiper edge. Round to the nearest inch, and there you go—you’ve got your wiper blade length!

We offer both framed and frameless standard duty wiper blades in our shop for all of your windshield-clearing needs.

Avoid Slow Windshield Wipers on Trains and Light Rail

Do you know what's a drag?  Sluggish windshield wipers on your train.  Here's a tip to help you out.

train-windshield-wipers.png

The nominally 12 V and 24 V wiper motors that power boat, truck and tractor wiper systems really operate at charging voltages of 13.5 V and 27 V, respectively.  However, many locomotive generating systems operate at 110 V and light rail often runs at 74 V.  They then use an inverter to step down high-voltage.

If you use a setpoint of 24 V or 12 V, you’ll end up with wipers that operate at a snail's pace. Instead, use setpoints of either 27 V or 13.5 V to pep up your wipers.

Easy, right?  Contact us if you've still got questions.

 

What's Your Windshield Wiper Park Position?

“Park position” refers to the place wipers stop when the system is turned off.  We designate the park position by which direction the arm travels to reach that location, either clockwise (CW) to park or counter-clockwise (CCW) to park.  These terms speak to directions as viewed from outside the vehicle looking in.

Confusing?  A little.  These diagrams should help.

Radial Park Positions

Radial Park Positions

Pantograph Park Positions

Pantograph Park Positions

For more definitions and answers, visit our Glossary & FAQs page.

Is It Time for New Wiper Blades?

There are a few ways to determine whether your current windshield wiper blades have overstayed their welcome. 

old-windshield-wipers.png

First, take a look at them.  Does the rubber look cracked and brittle?  The result can be insufficient windshield wiping coverage.  Are the frames rusty?  That can happen when your blades have served you through winter weather or in a marine environment.  Also check to make sure the blades have good contact with the glass, since a bend can hinder them from doing their job.

The easiest way to know you need new blades is by using your current ones.  Do they leave streaks?  Make a squeaking sound?  Chatter across the windshield?  Probably time to say goodbye and start with fresh ones.  

How can you keep your blades working at their best as long as possible?  Make sure your windshield is clean, and never use your windshield wipers on dry glass.  Bear in mind, wiper blades aren't meant to last forever because rubber is a natural product that is affected by its environment.  We recommend inspecting your windshield wiper blades every six months and replacing as needed for maximum visibility.